How to Use In-Text Citations in MLA Format Worksheet

Category: MLA Guide

Practice following the MLA Guide with this In-Text Citations in MLA Format Worksheet to ensure you are properly citing resource materials. Two different types of exercises ask you to identify whether the correct citation is used and to introduce quotations with a signal phrase.

How to Use In-Text Citations in MLA Format

Instructions

For exercises 1-5, make any corrections to the in-text citation. If the citation is correct, write “correct” underneath the direct or indirect quote. For exercises 5-10, write the given quote into a sentence using a signal phrase. You may write signal phrases for direct or indirect quotations that include all or part of the information provided in the quoted material.
For all 10 exercises, the source information is provided, but make up the page number for the quote from within the page range given.

Source from Sample Works Cited for exercises 1-5:

Ivancevich, John M.; Matteson, Michael T.; Freedman, Sara M.; Phillips, James S. “Worksite
Stress Management Interventions.” American Psychologist Vol 45.2 (1990): 252-261.
Print.

1. “Despite the general agreement that stress plays a role in everyday life, there continues to be substantial controversy about how stress can be managed at the worksite” (Ivancevich et el 252).

2. According to Ivancevich and other researchers, “during the last decade, our knowledge of stress management interventions has increased substantially” (vol 45, pg 252).

3. “Despite the general agreement that stress plays a role in everyday life, there continues to be substantial controversy about how stress can be managed at the worksite. … and deficiencies in the literature exist” (Ivancevich, Matteson, Freedman, and Phillips, 252-261).

4. Ivancevich et el determined through research that the best way to approach stress management in the workplace varies across the board even though it is generally agreed upon that the stress itself is a problem. Current research provides some insight, but it does not lay the subject to rest (252).

5. The research indicates that “knowledge of stress management interventions has increased substantially” over the last 10 years (Ivancevich, 252).

Source from Sample Works Cited for exercises 6-10:

Redelmeier, Donald M.D. and Tibshirani, Robert J. Ph.D. “Association Between
Cellular-Telephone Calls and Motor Vehicle Collisions.” The New England Journal of
Medicine Vol 336.7 (1997): 453-458. Web 6 June 2012.

6. The increase in risk appeared to be greatest for calls made near the time of the collision, and was not statistically significant for calls ma“de more than 15 minutes before the event.”

Quote with a signal phrase:

7. “In no group did cellular-telephone use have a protective effect.”

Quote with a signal phrase:

8. “The highest risk was found among subjects who had not graduated from high school.”

Quote with a signal phrase:

9. “In particular, subjects with many years of experience in using a cellular telephone still had a significant increase in risk.”

Quote with a signal phrase:

10. Younger drivers were at a somewhat higher relative risk when using a cellular telephone than older drivers, although, the trend was not significant.”

Quote with a signal phrase: