Using Quotations: How to Use Direct and Indirect Quotations Worksheet

Research Writing: Citing References

Practice with this Using Quotations for Direct and Indirect Quotations Worksheet to improve your research writing. Through the completion of ten exercises, you decide which type of quotation to use and how to introduce and discuss it.

Instructions

For each of the exercises below, decide whether to use a direct or indirect quotation, and give examples when they are requested. To complete the exercises, you can either use quotations you intend to use in a paper, or find an article on the internet to pull quotations from in the course of completing each exercise.

  • Use information you already have to use in a research paper, or select information you would quote from the article you selected. Would you use a direct or indirect quotation for the formation? Explain the reason for your choice.

  • Using the quotation you selected in the first exercise, write three different signal phrases that introduce the quotation using an introductory element or phrase.

  • Signal phrase #1:
    Signal phrase #2:
    Signal phrase #3:

  • What does the signal phrase tell your readers about how you feel about the quotation? Are any of them neutral, positive or negative? Identify the feeling that each signal phrase conveys.

  • Signal phrase #1:
    Signal phrase #2:
    Signal phrase #3:

  • For the same quotation used in exercise #2, write an independent clause followed by a colon to introduce the quotation.

  • What would you write following the quotation to discuss the information within it? Write at least one sentence that discusses the quotation.

  • Select a second piece of information you would use in a quotation. If you used a direct quotation in exercise #1, use an indirect one. If you used an indirect quotation in exercise #1, use a direct one.

  • Using the quotation you selected in exercise #6, write three different signal phrases that introduce the quotation using an introductory element or phrase.

  • Signal phrase #1:
    Signal phrase #2:
    Signal phrase #3:

  • What does the signal phrase tell your readers about how you feel about the quotation? Are any of them neutral, positive or negative? Identify the feeling that each signal phrase conveys.

  • Signal phrase #1:
    Signal phrase #2:
    Signal phrase #3:

  • For the same quotation used in exercise #7, write an independent clause followed by a colon to introduce the quotation.

  • What would you write following the quotation to discuss the information within it? Write at least one sentence that discusses the quotation.