Lead Versus Led

View Worksheet

Definition of “lead”

There are many definitions of “lead,” and each depends on the context of a sentence. The confusion comes in by the way the different meanings are pronounced. “Lead,” depending on the meaning, can function as a noun, adjective or verb. The biggest confusion comes into play when it is used as a verb. The most common definitions of “lead” as a verb are 1) to show the way or 2) in the front. “Lead” is the present tense of the verb.

When used as a verb, “lead” rhymes with “bead.” As a noun, “lead” rhymes with “bed” when it means a type of metallic element and rhymes with “bead” when it means a dog’s leash or the first position. Both pronunciations can also apply to adjectives, with the difference originating from the context. Consider the following examples:

Example 1: Serena leads the team with her determination and confidence (“leads” is a verb meaning shows the way).

Example 2: She is in the lead (“lead” is a noun meaning in the first position).

Example 3: You are the instructors’ choice for lead dancer (“lead” is an adjective that modifies “dancer”).

Example 4: His dog is off the lead (“noun” meaning dog’s leash).

Example 5: Lead is often used in fishing weights (“lead” is a noun meaning a type of metal).

Definition of “led”

“Led” in most cases is a verb. It is the past tense and past participle of “lead” as a verb when the pronunciation of “lead” rhymes with “bead.” Consider the following examples:

Example 6: She led the team to victory last week in the championship game (“led” is a verb in past tense form).

Example 7: She has led the team to victory in the championship game (“led” is a verb in past participle form).

When in doubt

Most of the confusion in determining whether to use “lead” versus “led” arises when it is used as a verb. The most important thing to consider is the intended meaning and as what part of speech “lead” is functioning. If you are proofreading or editing, it is important to look at the context of the sentence and the surrounding sentences when the meaning is not clear within the sentence itself. When looking at the context for the verb “lead,” consider whether the sentence is in present or past tense. “Lead” (rhymes with “bead”) is always used in the present tense, and “led” (rhymes with “bed”) is always used in the past tense.