Prepositions for Time, Place and Introducing Objects

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Prepositions of time

Prepositions are words that show the relationship between two things. Prepositions of time show a relationship between the action in a sentence and when it will happen. The preposition ‘on’ is used with days of the week. For example: I will go to the show on Tuesday. The preposition ‘at’ is used with times of day. For example: Lunch is at noon. The preposition ‘in’ is used with months, years and seasons. For example: I run cross country in the spring. Finally, the prepositions or combinations of prepositions ‘since,’ ‘from —to,’ ‘for,’ ‘by,’ ‘from — until,’ ‘during’ and ‘within’ are used to express extended time. For example: I have not had anything to eat since yesterday.

INCORRECT: The general charged the enemy on yesterday. The enemy lost the big battle during noon.

CORRECT: The general charged the enemy on Friday. The enemy lost the big battle at noon.

Prepositions of place

Several prepositions can be used to give the relationship between an object and a place. For brevity’s sake, imagine a frog and a log. Using words that answer where the frog is in relationship to the log, you can find prepositions of place. For example: the frog stood on the log. Now the frog is inside the log. Later the frog sat by the log. Here you saw the prepositions ‘on,’ ‘inside’ and ‘by’ being used as prepositions of place.

INCORRECT: The noble cat ran during the dragon to slay him and take his golden apples.

CORRECT: The noble cat ran toward the dragon to slay him and take his golden apples.

Introducing objects

Prepositions that introduce objects work closely with verbs. The preposition ‘at’ works with verbs including: ‘glance,’ ‘laugh’ and ‘look.’ For example: He took one glance at her and fell in love. The preposition ‘of’ works with the verbs ‘approve,’ ‘consist’ and ‘smell.’ For example: the bread consists of flour, egg and yeast.

The prepositions ‘of’ and ‘about’ work with verbs such as ‘dream’ and ‘think.’ For example: I often think about nice summer days during the winter. Finally, the preposition ‘for’ can be used with verbs like ‘wait,’ ‘watch’ and ‘call.’ For example, ‘I’ll wait for my pie at the counter.’

INCORRECT: Sir Kitten didn’t laugh in the dragon’s joke and so the dragon roared loudly with rage.

CORRECT: Sir Kitten didn’t laugh at the dragon’s joke and so the dragon roared loudly with rage.